NCX 2019 Clinics North Central Crossing 2019 clinic line-up offers a variety of topics. The clinics feature well known presenters as well as modelers beginning to showcase their knowledge.  A schedule formatted for printing is now available.  Please note the schedule is subject to change.
For a printable PDF file of the clinic schedule, Click Here.   (Opens a new browser tab)
For background information on some of the Clinicians, Click Here.
Topic:  and DescriptionPresenterDay & Time
DCC Revealed:  This clinic will enhance your understanding of the DCC signal through discussion and observation. We will investigate how DCC works at the data level. The voltage levels,  packet format and timing will be discussed. Various ways to measure DCC will be presented and the DCC signal will be observed with an oscilloscope and a data analyzer. Pay attention, because by the end of the presentation, several of your long-held beliefs about DCC may be challenged. Jim BakerSaturday
10-11AM
Signaling on a Railroad:  Learn the engineering basic of a Centralized Traffic Control (CTC) system, from the field locations to the dispatcher's office. A crash course on making you a miniature railroad signal engineer!Mike BurgettFriday 11AM-12PM
Saturday
11AM-12PM
Full and Complete Operations on a Small Layout:  Full and complete operation on a room size layout. This clinic will show you how to have satisfying operation on your small room size layout like the basement empires do. The ideas and suggestions presented will change the way you view your layout. There are possibilities that our discussion will permit you to find in and around your layout. The number of operators you will need along with the operational design will be reviewed. In no time you will be able to host op sessions as part of a round robin group of larger layouts. Come and see the real size of your layout.Dave Capron
MMR
Friday
9-10AM
Saturday
11AM-12PM
Building Craftsman Kits:  (Note:  This is a 2 hour clinic.) Forty years ago there were Campbell and Suydam kits. Scratch building was the only way to get great looking structures on your layout. Today there are hundreds of kits from dozens of craftsman kit manufacturers. This clinic will cover both the basics of kit construction and how to build award winning kits and dioramas. The use of basic and advanced tools, glues and adhesives, paints, stains, washes and chalks will be covered. Construction techniques and various methods will be shown. The tips and suggestions that are not in print are reviewed. Interior and exterior detail and signage is also demonstrated. We will quantify the difference between a layout model and an award winning kit. Finally, the diorama for multiple kits and scenery will be discussed. You have seen scratch building clinics – now learn how to construct the $25 to $300 craftsman kits that will be a center point on your layout. Dave Capron
MMR
Thursday
7-9PM
Saturday
9-11AM
What can a Chief Clerk do for your layout operations?  Model railroaders either love or hate Car Cards.  While they seem prototypical they are not.  Engineers did not and do not deal with them and neither do the conductors.  That paperwork is handled by the station clerks.  We take all the Car Card boxes off the layout facia and put them together in a 'Chief Clerks' astation similar to the Dispatchers Station.  The clerk now has all cards and boxes for all customers in one place.  As the train makes his run, working from a manifest and switch list he proceeds from town to town performing his setouts and pickups.  Before leaving a town he calls the Chief Clerk and reports his switching.  The Clerk has a packet of cards for his train and proceeds to use the boxes to make the appropriate  changes.  When the train terminates the clerk has a packet of Car Cards that match his consist and the Card Card boxes have the current car cards in them.  
While this will be cumbersome with large layouts it works great for the smaller room size layouts.  The engineers are not burdened with shuffling cards and there is one more job on the layout, the Chief Clerk. The layout gets restaged and the clerks station has record of where all cars are on it.  It is also very prototypical of what the railroads did prior to computerization. Come see what a 'Chief Clerk' can do for your layout and operations.
Dave Capron
MMR
Friday
12-1PM
Saturday
12-1PM
Modeling Slate Roofs: Because slate was used as a roofing material over a wide geographic region, there are many modelers who will want to have slate-roofed structures on their layouts. The great Pennsylvania Slate Belt lies less than 100 miles north and west from the location of this convention and was a great customer of the local railroads. This clinic, an extension of Bruce’s RMC article from May 2009, will look at how slate roofs were/are constructed in the real world and then ways to simulate them on our models. This clinic has been accepted into the NMRA’s EduTRAIN® Program.  Bruce De Young
MMR
Thursday
7-8PM
The Logging Railroads of Pennsylvania: The Industries Served: The peak period of logging by rail in Pennsylvania ran from 1880 until roughly 1929. During that period there were literally hundreds of logging railroads that came, operated, and then disappeared. About half of those railroads were narrow gauge. In Pennsylvania, unlike in some other logging locations, there were many forest-product related industries served by these railroads. This clinic will discuss the variety of industries in the woods, and how they were interrelated. These will be looked at from both a prototype and modeling perspective. The presentation contains many prototype photos of the period and is augmented by model photos from Bruce’s HOn3 Slate Run Railroad and a sampling of model photos from friends in the hobby. Although this is a “Stand Alone” clinic, it is augmented by Bruce’s other clinic: The Logging Railroads of Pennsylvania: Motive Power, Rolling Stock, and Infrastructure.  Bruce De Young
MMR
Friday
9-10AM
The Logging Railroads of Pennsylvania: Motive Power, Rolling Stock and Infrastructure: The peak period of logging by rail in Pennsylvania ran from 1880 until roughly 1929. During that period there were literally hundreds of logging railroads that came, operated, and then disappeared. About half of those railroads were narrow gauge. As is often the case with logging railroads, the motive power, rolling stock and infrastructure was unique, often made in the ‘back shop’, and perhaps even ‘quaint’. Throughout the clinic, both a prototype and modeling perspective will be examined. The presentation contains many prototype photos of the period and is augmented by model photos from Bruce’s HOn3 Slate Run Railroad and a sampling of model photos from friends in the hobby. Although this is a “Stand Alone” clinic, it is augmented by Bruce’s other clinic: The Logging Railroads of Pennsylvania: The Industries Served. Bruce De Young
MMR
Friday
10-11AM
Railroads and the Natural Ice Industry: A Symbiotic Relationship:  The harvesting of natural ice to preserve food and cool drinks began in the early 1800’s on farms and homesteads. However, buy the middle of the 1800’s, it became a large industry. Like many other industries involving heavy, bulky commodities, the ice industry turned to the railroads to transport their product. For the next 50-60 years, the natural ice industry became huge customers of the railroads. At the same time, shipping refrigerated products by rail increased dramatically, and the railroads became huge customers of the ice industry. A symbiotic relationship indeed.  In this clinic, Bruce will look at the commercial process of harvesting, storing, and shipping natural ice and the role that railroads used in the process.Bruce De Young
MMR
Thursday
8-9PM
Fascinating Facts About Steam Locomotive Development:  What caused the drive for bigger, more powerful steam locomotives?  What impeded that growth, and what enabled it?  How did steam throttles develop to handle the growing volume and pressure of steam that enabled higher horsepower?  How fascinating can firebox grates be?  What caused compound engines to fall out of favor?  Find out what the writings of Alfred W. Bruce, Chief Engineer of Alco during much of this development, can tell us about these questions and more.Phil DoolittleFriday 12PM-1PM
Saturday
9-10AM
JMRI and LCC, an Update: The clinic will begin with a very brief introduction to JMRI, free software for model railroading, followed by an introduction to the newest NMRA standard, LCC.  The relationship between LCC and DCC will be discussed, including how both can be used together to create a great layout.  JMRI support for LCC will be mentioned.  How LCC fits into the plans for the new KMRHS layout, and why use LCC there, will be described.  Dave DuChampFriday
11AM-12PM
Saturday
12-1PM
Toledo Terminal Railroad 1975-1983:  This Clinic is not a how to do or make clinic, it is an educational clinic in the sense that you are going to see a snippet of time and activities of a short line railroad that lasted 80 plus years in the Toledo, Ohio area.  The main purpose of the Terminal was to pick up car load setoffs from main line railroads and deliver them to various industries around Toledo.  In return, manufacturers would call for a car load pickup and the Terminal would pick them up and set them out in various yards around town for pickup by the main line roads.  This was all done in a 28 mile loop that circled the City of Toledo. 
This clinic originated as a presentation to the B&O Historical Society of photos I had of the B&O on the Terminal.  I’ve also included some photos of other activities on the railroad.  My tenure with the Terminal began in 1976 as a part time job between teaching contracts and lasted until 1983 when the Terminal was disbanded.  My thanks to the late Phil Schuster, Chief Civil Engineer, for the experiences I had during that time.  Although mostly gone from view, there are some parts of the Terminal that still exist.  What does is part of today’s CSX Transportation System which was then the Chessy System, 1/3 owner of the Terminal.
Ray HuberFriday
11AM-12PM
The President Travels By Train:  A brief history of Presidential train travel, composition of a such a train, security required in such visits and how a Presidential train trip can be incorporated into an operating session.   Clinic includes a number of PowerPoint slides.Rad JonesFriday
1-2PM
Servos 101:  This clinic will discuss servos, what they are, how they work, and the many uses they have in model railroading. Richard KubeckSaturday
9-10AM
Servos for Railroads:  This clinic will describe and demonstrate servo control systems from various manufacturers such as ANE MODEL, Peco, Berrett Hill, and Walthers. Richard KubeckSaturday
10-11AM
Advanced Servo Control for Railroads:  Here you will learn advanced servo control techniques using systems from Micro-Mark, Servo City, and Mybiotic.  This clinic will also describe controls for semaphores.  Richard KubekSaturday
11AM-12PM
Just Roofs:  The clinic "Just Roofs" addresses one particular aspect of model building, the roof. From substructures to roofing materials to weathering to roof gizmology, this clinic aims at assisting the modeler in improving those elements that are barely seen in real life but are highly visible in layout modeling.Dan LewisFriday
8-9AM
and 1-2PM
Under Pressure:  Operating the Pere Marquette 1225 Locomotive:  Steam railroading! The sights, the sounds!  What a wonderful time to be a railroad man!  Or was it? In this clinic you will see how the volunteers  of the Steam Railroading Institute in Owosso, MI operate the Pere Marquette 1225 Berkshire on several excursions throughout the year. In this clinic you'll learn how the locomotive is taken from 300 tons of cold, empty steel to a hot, smoking, thundering beast.  You'll see what's involved to keep all those moving parts lubricated and functioning on the road.  And you'll learn what happens in the cab while rolling down the track, tending the fire, the water level, and what the cab crew thinks about and pays attention to so the train completes it's trip safely, problem free, and on time.  Finally you'll see what happens at the end of the day when the night crew takes over to make sure the locomotive is ready for the next day's trips. Dean Pyers
George Van Duyne
Friday
12PM-1PM
HO Scale Vehicles:   While there are many HO scale vehicles on the market today, they may not exactly meet your needs. In this clinic you will learn techniques for creating your own unique vehicles for specific requirements.  Techniques for building vehicle kits as designed, or for kit-bashing vehicle models will be discussed.  Horse drawn vehicles will also be included.  Focus era will be the 1920's but techniques would apply to vehicles of any era. Greg RichFriday 10-11AM
History of the Ford Rouge Railroad:Anthony RzucidoFriday
10-11AM
Delving into Details:  Details improve realism, as well as customizing and personalizing our models. This clinic presents examples of details added to structures, locomotives, rolling stock, and layout scenes. A variety of construction materials are covered, along with making customized details with kitbashed and scratchbuilt components. Interior scale lighting with LEDs and finishing techniques using acrylic paints are also part of the clinic.Sam SwansonSaturday
9-10AM
Saturday
12-1PM
Weathering Models Using Acrylic Paints:  This clinic addresses working with acrylic paints for general hobby use and for weathering techniques. Many time saving tips for cleaner, more efficient painting are covered along with many tricks learned over the years.Lee TurnerSaturday
10-11AM
Creating Winter Scenery:  The season of winter is seldom seen on a model railroad.  A winter landscape can present a dramatic change of scenery on your railroad or in a diorama.   It can also challenge your modeling skills and perhaps your patience in new ways.  This clinic will describe some planning considerations, tools, and techniques that can be used for snow scenes that were found through research, testing, trial, and sometimes error.  George Van DuyneFriday
9-10AM
Saturday
11AM-12PM
Truss Bridge Variations:  Bridges are a fascinating component on most railroads.  This clinic takes you through the many varied styles of truss bridges and some of the considerations in making them structurally sound  for those massive train loads. It concludes with a look at the making of a unique prototype model to fill a gap on a club layout.  Rich WahlFriday
12-1PM
Getting Railroaded Down Under:  Getting Railroaded Down Under is all about my encounters with trains while vacationing in New Zealand and Australia back in 2015.  In New Zealand, we’ll climb aboard an incline cable car system with a “psychedelic” tunnel. Discover a restaurant inside a moving trolley car. And ride the scenically spectacular Taieri Gorge Railway.  Then its on to Australia to ride the quirky little Puffing Billy steam railroad, and take a 50 mile ride on a commuter train to visit a couple of great layouts.  You’ll also see how one city we visited took a page out of the model railroader’s handbook by using cardboard tubes and other unorthodox materials to build real twelve-inch-to-the-foot scale homes and businesses!   Jim ZinserFriday
12-1PM
Saturday
12-1PM